Blog

NANOWRIMO

Posted by on Nov 4, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

I’ve done a number of crazy things in my life and likely not enough of them so I have decided to write a book in the next 30 days!  For the first time I am participating in National Novel Writing Month, better known as NaNoWriMo.  I’ll be joining more than 400,000 other writers worldwide, many who complete this event year after year.  Best sellers attributed to NaNoWriMo include Sara Gruen’s Water for Elephants, The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern and Hugh Howey’s Wool.  The goal, of course, is not to create a best seller (though I suppose it is every writer’s dream) but to complete 50,000 words of a single book during the month of November. I am signed up at nanowrimo.org, purchased Scrivener and spent a good part of today building my Chapters and Scenes so that I am ready to write first thing tomorrow.  50,000 words in 30 days is 1,667 words a day and after having written a short document a few days ago, of only 587 words, I began to stress out over how very many words 1,667 will be, especially day after day.  I have ideas, but do I have that many ideas – 50,000 words worth of ideas? The basic concept of my book was originally non-fiction based on the experiences of my spouse and I in caring for his mother who has severe memory loss due to TIAs.  Despite a career in health care and lots of reading and networking around care-taking for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s, we discover surprises over and over again.  After a session with a book coach, I am choosing to write a fiction account of our experiences.  I expect my writing will be mostly true, allowing for storytelling which is my true love. NaNoWriMo does award any official prizes, however, anyone who completes 50,000 words is declared a winner.  I plan to be a winner.  Wish me...

Read More

Why Transformation?

Posted by on Sep 29, 2014 in Blog | 4 comments

Why Transformation?

Life brings us transitions – we cannot avoid them. Jobs change, people enter and leave our lives, health and illness spend their time with us and our loved ones. By definition, a transition is a change from one state to another and can be as simple as moving from one action to the next. We can chose to simply move through our transitions, enjoying some and gritting our teeth as we accept the others. There is no embarrassment in this and I call it surviving at life, a tactic I employed well into my 30’s. Alternatively, we can challenge ourselves to turn our transitions into a completely different experience – a transformation. We can experience a more dramatic impact from the inevitable change, in both form and function and in outcome. We can be changed by our transitions and thus garner power and wisdom from each and every one of them. This is as true of organizations as it is of individuals. We can choose to nurture an organizational transition and create a transformation within our team and, indeed, our entire organization’s culture. In speaking to others about transformation, I hear lots of references to butterflies. And while the process of the cocoon to the butterfly is a beautiful story, there is no intentionality on the part of the insect. We often call this seeming miracle a transformation, but, in fact, it is a most basic transition – the chrysalis makes no investment in this process – it simply happens. By accepting and honoring the transitions in our lives and increasing our awareness of the impact and potential opportunities they brings to us, we can choose to transform. Both transitions and transformation take time and effort – why not embark on the quest of transformation and invest in best possible YOU on the other side of each and every transition by making it a transformational...

Read More